Diabetes Types of Insulin – PostCare Recovery Patient Education HD

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Insulin is the hormone normally made in the pancreas that stimulates the flow of sugar – glucose – from the blood into the cells of the body. Glucose provides the cells with the energy they need to function.

There are two main groups of insulins used in the treatment of diabetes: human insulins and analog insulins, made by recombinant DNA technology.

The concentration of most insulins available in the United States is 100 units per milliliter. A milliliter is equal to a cubic centimeter. All insulin syringes are graduated to match this insulin concentration.

There are four categories of insulins depending on how quickly they start to work in the body after injection:
Very rapid acting insulin
Regular, or Rapid acting insulins
Intermediate acting insulins
Long acting insulin.

In addition, some insulins are marketed mixed together in different proportions to provide both rapid and long acting effects. Certain insulins can also be mixed together in the same syringe immediately prior to injection.

A very rapid acting form of insulin called Lispro insulin is marketed under the trade name of Humalog.

A second form of very rapid acting insulin is called Aspart and is marketed under the trade name Novolog.

Humalog and Novolog are:
clear liquids.
They begin to work 10 minutes after injection,
peak at 1 hour after injection,
and last 3-4 hours in the body.

Most patients also need a longer-acting insulin to maintain good control of their blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog can be mixed with NPH, Lente and Ultralente insulins.
Humalog and Novolog are used as “bolus” insulins to be given 15 minutes before a meal.
Most patients also need a longer-acting insulin to maintain good control of their blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog can be mixed with NPH, Lente and Ultralente insulins.

Humalog and Novolog are used as “bolus” insulins to be given 15 minutes before a meal.
Most patients also need a longer-acting insulin to maintain good control of their blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog can be mixed with NPH, Lente and Ultralente insulins.

Check your blood sugar level before giving Humalog or Novalog.
Your doctor or diabetes educator will instruct you in determining your insulin dose based on your blood sugar reading and anticipated meals and exercise.
Always check the bottle before drawing up the insulin. If the solution is cloudy, discard the bottle.

If you are mixing Humalog or Novalog with a longer-acting insulin, always draw up the Humalog or Novalog first to maintain the purity and clarity of the Humalog and Novalog solutions.

Another solution of insulin that acts rapidly is called “Regular” or “R” insulin. This insulin does not act as quickly as Humalog or Novalog.

Regular insulin is:
a clear, colorless liquid.
It begins to work 30 minutes after injection,
peaks at 3-5 hours
and lasts 6-10 hours in the body.

Regular insulin is:
usually given 30 minutes before a meal.
It can also be mixed with in the same syringe with longer acting NPH, Lente and Ultralente insulins or given separately immediately after each other.
Glargine cannot be mixed with it.

Regular insulin is:
the most stable of all the different types of insulin,
but unopened regular insulin is best refrigerated.
Always check the bottle before drawing up the insulin.
If the solution is cloudy, discard the bottle.

If you are mixing Regular with a longer-acting insulin, always draw up the Regular insulin first to maintain the purity and clarity of the Regular solution.

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